Bumblebees Taking a Nosedive in North America

Within the past 20 years abundances of the bee species Bombus occidentalis, B. affinis, B. pensylvanicus, and B. terricola have plummeted by up to 96 percent.

The finding is based on a new analysis of more than 73,000 museum collections of bumblebees, which showed where bees had been found over the last century, as well as collections of wild bees across the United States. The study looked at 8 of the 50 known bumblebee species in North America.

New Snub-Nosed Monkey Discovered, Eaten

  • October 27th, 2010
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The only scientifically observed specimen had been killed by local hunters the time researchers found it—and was eaten soon after. But local demand for monkey meat is only one reason the new species is already considered endangered.

Canadian Rain Forest Edges Oil Pipeline Path

The pipeline would pass through watersheds important to Canada’s commercial fishing industry and brush past Coastal First Nations lands and the Great Bear Rainforest, a protected coastal area filled with red cedars, spruce, and the elusive all-white “spirit bear.”

Two New Horned Dinosaurs Found in Utah

Two newly discovered horned dinosaur species from an ancient “lost continent” are some of the most surprising and ornate yet found, paleontologists say. The new dinosaurs are members of the ceratopsids, the group of dinosaurs that includes Triceratops. The animals were generally four-legged herbivores with horns and bony frills rising from the backs of their […]

Urban Foragers Cropping Up in U.S.

In Sacramento, they pick figs, kumquats, and plums from public trees. In New York, they harvest purslane–an edible flower–from the cracks in the sidewalk. Down south, it’s fiddlehead ferns, and just about everywhere, people are picking black walnuts, wild mushrooms, and dandelion greens.

Urban foraging–gathering fruit, vegetables, and other useful things from parks, lawns, and sidewalks–isn’t a new thing. But as more urbanites become aware of the free bounty surrounding them, new issues are–pardon the pun–cropping up. When a public park’s berry patch is raided, whose responsibility is it to make sure there are some left for everyone to enjoy? What about pesticides?

Your Hair Reveals Whether You’re a Morning Person

  • August 23rd, 2010
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Early bird or late riser? The mysteries of your sleep cycle may be unlocked by the hairs on your head, a new study says.

That’s because the genes that regulate our body clocks can be found in hair-follicle cells, researchers have discovered.

RoboCup 2010: Could Robot versus Human Be Far Behind?

As the World Cup races forward in South Africa a different kind of soccer tournament recently kicked off in Asia. And whereas debates in Cape Town and Johannesburg may center on the Jabulani ball’s aerodynamics or the vuvuzela’s “unique” sound, in Singapore coaches are more likely to worry whether their favorite player has blown a fuse.

Youngest Planet Confirmed; Photos Show It Grew Up Fast

  • June 10th, 2010
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by Rachel KaufmanPublished in National Geographic News2010-06-10 They’re not the most aww-inspiring baby pictures, but new infrared images prove the youngest known planet outside our solar system does in fact exist—and that planets can grow up fast—a new study says. Probably only a few million years young, Beta Pictoris b is already fully formed, despite […]

Crocodiles Body Surf to Hop Between Islands

  • June 7th, 2010
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Published in National Geographic News Saltwater crocodiles in the South Pacific travel between islands by body surfing, according to new research designed in part by late “Crocodile Hunter” Steve Irwin. The world’s largest living reptile, the saltwater crocodile is found in brackish and freshwater habitats extending east-west from East India to Fiji and north-south from […]